MySQL Dump Full Structure, Partial Data, With Triggers & Routines.

You want to do a MySQL dump. You want the entire structure of the database but you want to exclude some tables because they are too big, have sensitive data, or other reasons. Your MySQL database has triggers, routines, and all that good stuff because it’s 2016.

When I went looking for a solution I read a tutorial that wrongly suggested dumping triggers and schema together in the first step. The problem with this approach is when you import your data, the ON INSERT triggers are executed, and this can lead to primary key conflicts or other weird issues. I learned the hard way.

A better way:

  • Schema first
  • Data next
  • Triggers and routines last
mysqldump --no-data --skip-triggers DATABASE > FILE.sql

mysqldump --no-create-db --no-create-info --skip-triggers --ignore-table=TABLE1--ignore-table=TABLE2 DATABASE >> FILE.sql

mysqldump --no-create-db --no-create-info --no-data  --routines --triggers --skip-opt DATABASE >> FILE.sql

Good times.

Free Online Scrum Training

These Scrum Training Series videos are my favourite. The site also offers a nice Scrum reference card. Choice quote:

Doing Scrum, or Pretending to Do Scrum? Scrum’s relentless reality checks expose dysfunctional constraints in individuals, teams, and organizations. Many people claiming to do Scrum modify the parts that require breaking through organizational impediments and end up robbing themselves of most of the benefits.

Autocomplete a Silex Project in PHPStorm

The problem with Silex, and Pimple in general, is that when you do:

$app = new \Pimple\Container();
$app['Foo'] = function () { return new \Acme\Foo(); };
$app['Bar'] = function () { return new \Acme\Bar(); };

PHPStorm has no way of knowing what’s going on in, or how to auto-complete, $app.

I’ve gotten around this in the past by creating an “Inception Proxy” alongside a .phpstorm.meta.php configuration but for a new Silex project I’ve inherited this is not possible.

Pro-tip: If your IDE doesn’t know what’s going on then neither will the poor jerks who inherit your code.

Looking for a solution to this I discovered the PHPStorm Silex Plugin. It’s a bit wonky but it does the job. (sometimes the IDE doesn’t recognize $app and I don’t know why yet.)

For the Silex Plugin to work it requires a manually created configuration file in the project root named “pimple.json”. This file more or less duplicates the functionality of .phpstorm.meta.php but I digress… Pimple.json can be automatically generated using Pimple Dumper.

The format of “pimple.json” looks like:

[
    {
        "name": "routes",
        "type": "class",
        "value": "Symfony\\Component\\Routing\\RouteCollection"
    },
    {
        "name": "request.http_port",
        "type": "int",
        "value": 80
    },
    {
        "name": "charset",
        "type": "string",
        "value": "UTF-8"
    }
]

Once that file is in place, and you jiggle the IDE/Plugin, auto-complete comes alive! Horray for sanity.

Password Protect WordPress Admin With .htaccess

The wp-admin panel is already password protected in that you are required to login. Sometimes that’s not good enough. This tutorial explains how to add an additional layer of authentication to the login process, essentially blocking wp-login.php requests from annoying bots or other malicious users.

Step 1:

Create a `/path/to/.htpasswd` file. (More info.)

Step 2:

Create a `/path/to/your/site/wp-admin/.htacess` file with the following content:

AuthUserFile /path/to/.htpasswd
AuthType basic
AuthName "Restricted Resource"
require valid-user

# Whitelists

<Files "admin-ajax.php" >
   Order allow,deny
   Allow from all
   Satisfy any
</Files>

<Files "*.css" >
   Order allow,deny
   Allow from all
   Satisfy any
</Files>

<Files ~ "\.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif)$">
   Order deny,allow
   Allow from all
   Satisfy any
</Files>

Change `/path/to/` your files accordingly.

Important! Under Whitelists I have added entries for admin-ajax.php, *.css, and a regular expression for images. This unblocks WordPress’ AJAX functionality used by certain plugins, as well as CSS and image files certain themes may be importing. Without these you risk breaking your site.

Step 3:

Append the following to your existing WordPress .htaccess file one parent folder up (Ie. /path/to/your/site/.htaccess):

<Files wp-login.php>
  AuthUserFile /path/to/.htpasswd
  AuthType basic
  AuthName "Restricted Resource"
  require valid-user
</Files>

Change `/path/to/` your files accordingly.

Fail Fast

My wife, my daughter, and I moved to Japan end of last year.

KIZU514, or me as a freelancer, was based on the idea that my wife would support our family in Japan while I would be some sort of bonus income.

We sacrificed a lot to get here but unfortunately Japan isn’t working out. We are disappointed but all things considered our adventure must end prematurely.

Moving forward I’m trying to find our way back to Montreal. That plan involves me looking for a job with health insurance.

I will keep running KIZU514 as a professional blog.

Waiting room
I am a patient boy…

The Code Manifesto

We want to work in an ecosystem that empowers developers to reach their potential–one that encourages growth and effective collaboration. A space that is safe for all.

A space such as this benefits everyone that participates in it. It encourages new developers to enter our field. It is through discussion and collaboration that we grow, and through growth that we improve.

In the effort to create such a place, we hold to these values:

  1. Discrimination limits us. This includes discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, nationality, technology and any other arbitrary exclusion of a group of people.
  2. Boundaries honor us. Your comfort levels are not everyone’s comfort levels. Remember that, and if brought to your attention, heed it.
  3. We are our biggest assets. None of us were born masters of our trade. Each of us has been helped along the way. Return that favor, when and where you can.
  4. We are resources for the future. As an extension of #3, share what you know. Make yourself a resource to help those that come after you.
  5. Respect defines us. Treat others as you wish to be treated. Make your discussions, criticisms and debates from a position of respectfulness. Ask yourself, is it true? Is it necessary? Is it constructive? Anything less is unacceptable.
  6. Reactions require grace. Angry responses are valid, but abusive language and vindictive actions are toxic. When something happens that offends you, handle it assertively, but be respectful. Escalate reasonably, and try to allow the offender an opportunity to explain themselves, and possibly correct the issue.
  7. Opinions are just that: opinions. Each and every one of us, due to our background and upbringing, have varying opinions. The fact of the matter, is that is perfectly acceptable. Remember this: if you respect your own opinions, you should respect the opinions of others.
  8. To err is human. You might not intend it, but mistakes do happen and contribute to build experience. Tolerate honest mistakes, and don’t hesitate to apologize if you make one yourself.

Source