Free Online Scrum Training

These Scrum Training Series videos are my favourite. The site also offers a nice Scrum reference card. Choice quote:

Doing Scrum, or Pretending to Do Scrum? Scrum’s relentless reality checks expose dysfunctional constraints in individuals, teams, and organizations. Many people claiming to do Scrum modify the parts that require breaking through organizational impediments and end up robbing themselves of most of the benefits.

The Code Manifesto

We want to work in an ecosystem that empowers developers to reach their potential–one that encourages growth and effective collaboration. A space that is safe for all.

A space such as this benefits everyone that participates in it. It encourages new developers to enter our field. It is through discussion and collaboration that we grow, and through growth that we improve.

In the effort to create such a place, we hold to these values:

  1. Discrimination limits us. This includes discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, nationality, technology and any other arbitrary exclusion of a group of people.
  2. Boundaries honor us. Your comfort levels are not everyone’s comfort levels. Remember that, and if brought to your attention, heed it.
  3. We are our biggest assets. None of us were born masters of our trade. Each of us has been helped along the way. Return that favor, when and where you can.
  4. We are resources for the future. As an extension of #3, share what you know. Make yourself a resource to help those that come after you.
  5. Respect defines us. Treat others as you wish to be treated. Make your discussions, criticisms and debates from a position of respectfulness. Ask yourself, is it true? Is it necessary? Is it constructive? Anything less is unacceptable.
  6. Reactions require grace. Angry responses are valid, but abusive language and vindictive actions are toxic. When something happens that offends you, handle it assertively, but be respectful. Escalate reasonably, and try to allow the offender an opportunity to explain themselves, and possibly correct the issue.
  7. Opinions are just that: opinions. Each and every one of us, due to our background and upbringing, have varying opinions. The fact of the matter, is that is perfectly acceptable. Remember this: if you respect your own opinions, you should respect the opinions of others.
  8. To err is human. You might not intend it, but mistakes do happen and contribute to build experience. Tolerate honest mistakes, and don’t hesitate to apologize if you make one yourself.

Source

SCRUM Open Assessments

“The way to make a million dollars is to start a religion software development methodology.”

What does it mean to be a SCRUM disciple when you are a lone freelancer working remotely? For me it means the knowledge you retain by practising SCRUM in an Agile work environment fades.

Doing these open exams once-in-a-while helps jog my memory:

…bet you can’t beat my scores!

Developer Open
100% of my SCRUM – up to you true star.

Point:

Counterpoint:

Making and Doing in Kamogawa, Japan

Hackerfarm is a place is located in rural Japan, about two hours east of Tokyo on the Boso peninsula. It’s a cluster of buildings, a lot of shared tools, and a beautiful country setting […] a collection of Japanese and foreign tech hackers who’ve escaped from city life. We’re working together on projects, making life richer for ourselves and for the community who have adopted us. »

More info:

Kamiyama and the Quest for a “New Work-Style”

A template to aspire to:

Mr. Shinya Ohminami, Chairman of Kamiyama’s Green Valley NPO, and his friends in Kamiyama started the “Kamiyama Artist in Residence” program to invite several artists to stay and pursue their work from Kamiyama. That was the first step, and from there followed new actions and initiatives based on their unique philosophy of “Creative Depopulation.”

More links: